Another Parenting Parable

Photo by yvonnekroese at Flickr.com

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A man came home from work late, tired and irritated, to find his 5-year old son waiting for him at the door.

SON : ‘Daddy, may I ask you a question?’

DAD : ‘Yeah sure, what it is?’ replied the man.

SON : ‘Daddy, how much do you make an hour?’

DAD : ‘That’s none of your business. Why do you ask such a thing?’ the man said angrily.

SON : ‘I just want to know.. Please tell me, how much do you make an hour?’

DAD : ‘If you must know, I make $20.00 an hour.’

SON : ‘Oh,’ the little boy replied, with his head down.

SON : ‘Daddy, may I please borrow $10.00 ?’

The father was furious, ‘If the only reason you asked that is so you can borrow some money to buy a silly toy or some other nonsense, then you march yourself straight to your room and go to bed. Think about why you are being so selfish. I work hard everyday for such this childish behavior.’

The little boy quietly went to his room and shut the door. The man sat down and started to get even angrier about the little boy’s questions. How dare he ask such questions only to get some money?

After about an hour or so, the man had calmed down, and started to think:

Maybe there was something he really needed to buy with that $10.00 and he really didn’t ask for money very often. The man went to the door of the little boy’s room and opened the door.

‘Are you asleep, son?’ He asked…

‘No daddy, I’m awake,’ replied the boy.

‘I’ve been thinking, maybe I was too hard on you earlier’ said the man.

‘It’s been a long day and I took out my aggravation on you. Here’s the $10.00 you asked for..’

The little boy sat straight up, smiling. ‘Oh, thank you daddy!’ He yelled.

Then, reaching under his pillow he pulled out some crumpled up bills. The man saw that the boy already had money, started to get angry again. The little boy slowly counted out his money, and then looked up at his father.

‘Why do you want more money if you already have some?’ the father grumbled.

‘Because I didn’t have enough, but now I do,’ the little boy replied.

‘Daddy, I have $20.00 now. Can I buy an hour of your time? Please come home early tomorrow. I would like to have dinner with you.’

The father was crushed. He put his arms around his little son, and he begged for his forgiveness.

It’s just a short reminder to all of you working so hard in life. We should not let time slip through our fingers without having spent some time with those who really matter to us, those close to our hearts.

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You can always replace man, Daddy and father with woman, Mommy and mother, and son with daughter — you get the point 🙂

Shared by Vit Panaguiton through e-mail

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Are Parenthood and Facebook incompatible?

Photo by davidgilmour at Flickr.com

The old adage of leaving work in the office and coming home as a parent and a spouse is now competing with today’s cannabis of the internet – social media. Here are some quips about a Mom who struggled between good parenting and Facebook:

I love to be informed, to read about what other people are thinking or feeling, and the Internet became my vehicle for doing just that. Except it had become a nasty habit I secretly felt guilty about. Since I believe in the notion that if you feel guilty, you probably are, I knew something was wrong.

That was the day I knew I had to switch things up. I spent way too much time knocking around the net and way too little time planning my days and playing with my kids. So I determined what I had to do on the Internet and when I could do it. I delegated certain times of the day for work and for play. I stuck with the plan and it all went peachy — for a while.

To read more, go to Jamie Bissot’s Blog

A Book About Asian Parenting in the Western World

Author Amy Chua at IdeaFestival in 2008

Photo by geoffbugbee at Flickr.com

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What is a strict Chinese upbringing or an ethnically defined approach to parenting?

I read Amy Chua’s “Day of Empire” twice because I was just so amazed at how she factually deliberated the rise and fall of hyperpower nations of histories gone by. Now, her new book “Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother” espouses her own experience as an Asian mom. She defines “Chinese mother” loosely to include parents of other ethnicities who practice traditional, strict child-rearing, while also acknowledging that “Western parents come in all varieties,” and not all ethnically Chinese parents practice strict child-rearing.

“This is a story about a mother, two daughters, and two dogs. This was supposed to be a story of how Chinese parents are better at raising kids than Western ones. But instead, it’s about a bitter clash of cultures, a fleeting taste of glory, and how I was humbled by a thirteen-year-old.” In reality, it’s a controversy that’s now being talked about in American circles, like Tom Brokaw writes, “it will leave you breathless” and many similar responses.

Ms. Chua is of Chinese descent but was born and grew up in the American midwest. Her parents were ethnic Chinese from the Philippines before they emigrated to the United States. She graduated magna cum laude from Harvard while her husband, Jed Rubenfeld, was a summa cum laude graduate of Princeton University.

Definitely a “Must Buy!”

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