Parents Ask Should They Buy Their Kids Violent Video Games

Kids playing video games

Amy Dickinson is a columnist for The Washington Post and was recently asked by parents of two sons, ages 9 and 12, if they should hold their ground in buying their children video games that are rated T and M, all combat-type, shoot-em-up, kill-em-all, violent versions. It may matter in the house but once the boys visit their friends where parents allows these types of violent video games, they have no control over that.

Should these parents just give in?

Read the entire Q&A at The Washington Post

Photo by halfcaucazn at Flickr.com

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Children Who Walk to School Everyday Are Much Healthier

A long time ago, our parents used to study in a school that’s nearest to their house. Today, city life forces us to ride cars, school buses and public transportation to reach the school our kids go to. Not that it’s too far but crime has gone up considerably since and the penchant of parents to think of their children’s safety is paramount to providing them food, shelter and education.

CBC News recently wrote that researchers in Canada decided to analyze the characteristics of youngsters making their way to school under their own steam, described as “active transportation” — as opposed to getting a ride or taking a bus — to see what patterns emerged. Their study showed that children from lower socio-economic backgrounds, those with a single parent and those with an older sibling were more likely to fall into this category, they discovered. It also says that active transportation peaks at ages 10 to 11, and then declines after that. However, only 35 percent of that age category use active transportation.

Though schools have physical education classes every week, it isn’t much to garner for the amount of bodily activity they need. The thought that comes into mind is for parents to find creative means of allowing their kids to do active transportation on a routine basis. One could be dropping them off at their classmate’s house which is a few hundred meters away from school; pick them up at the restaurant or mall nearest to their school.

If you don’t live in a gated subdivision, find a way to create a routine where the daily activity of walking becomes a norm. The study also revealed that children who used active transportation over the course of three years had fewer weight issues, and consistently had a lower body mass index growth curve. One idea is to park your car near your kids school and walk with them. This way, you, too, get the much needed exercise.

Source: CBC News

Photo by zinkwazi at Flickr.com

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Colin Farrell Is Just Crazy About His Sons

Colin Farrell with his son James

Celebrity dad Colin Farrell has been opening up recently in interviews about his 7-year-old son, who has Angelman syndrome, and how he has a new respect for finding balance between his film career and family life.

After going to rehab in 2005 and putting an end to his partying days, Colin now has quit smoking, works out and puts his focus on his two sons. The Fright Night star’s sons, James, 7, and Henry, almost 2, are from separate relationships, but both live in L.A. where Colin does. James has Angelman syndrome, a neuro-developmental disorder. He started walking at the age of four and cannot speak, but Colin is “crazy” about him.

Read more at OK! Magazine

Photo by hollywoodkids at Flickr.com

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Husbands Are More Under Pressure by Marriage Gems

My kids and me

I’ve been a subscriber of “Marriage Gems” and would recommend Lori’s blog for your habitual reading on parenting and parenthood. For today, it’s a topic us men can relate, to wit, “Are Husbands under More Pressure than Ever?

Here are a few quips to her newest article:

Experts are now saying working fathers are experiencing the most pressure in families, even families in which both spouses work.

This is the final discussion of the research coming out of Time Magazine’s August issue. It shares a report by the Families and Work Institute, which surveyed 1,298 men.

Men who are experiencing overwhelming stresses should discuss their feelings with their wives in a way that is not accusatory.

Read more at Marriage Gems

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Summer of Hope Program Provides Adoption of Filipino Children in United States

Photo by suratlozowick at Flickr.com

John Levy, a 6-year-old boy from the Philippines, ran about giving hugs and meeting new people. When it was time to eat, he settled down on the grass with his host family, including host mom Vanessa Wilson.

The Summer of Hope program places children from around the world with Montana host families for a four-week period. Tuesday evening, at the program’s last summer picnic, some of those children and families came together at Lewis and Clark Park in Belgrade to play, enjoy the summer, and share their stories.

John Levy is one of nine children in Montana, including four from the Philippines and five from Ethiopia. All are with Bozeman-area families, with the exception of two children staying in Billings.

The Summer of Hope program the Druckenmillers and others have spearheaded focuses on providing adoption opportunities for older children because they’re much less likely to be adopted than infants or toddlers. The program is now in its ninth year, and 80 percent of the children involved in it have been adopted.

Read more at Bozeman Daily Chronicle

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Selma Blair and Her Happy Family

Photo from celebritybabyscoop.com thru INFPhoto.com

Proud new parents Selma Blair and Jason Bleick strolled hand-in-hand as they took their new baby boy Arthur for a walk around their Hollywood, California neighborhood today (August 6). This is the first we’ve seen of the couple since they welcomed their son on July 25.

Selma Blair first gained popular attention for her performance in Cruel Intentions (1999), a youthful retelling of the classic novel “Les Liaisons Dangereuses”. After graduating from high school in Michigan, Selma moved to New York City to pursue her goal of being a photographer but found her way to acting classes at The Stella Adler Conservatory and The Column Theatre.

Born Selma Blair Beitner on June 23, 1972 in Southfield, MI, the actress was the youngest of four girls. Her parents, Elliot and Molly Ann Beitner, divorced when she was 23; after which, she legally dropped her father’s name. “I have nothing to do with my father,” she said. “He is out of my life.” Her mother introduced her daughters as “the brain, the athlete, the klutz and then there was Selma – the manic-depressive.” Blair said she really was not that troubled, although her mom gave her a necklace with a smile on one side and a frown on the other to reflect her quick-changing moods. She attended a Jewish day school and then Cranbrook Kingswood school in Bloomfield Hills, MI before attending Kalamazoo College her freshman year, where she acted in a play titled “The Little Theater of the Green Goose.”

Sources: Celebrity Baby Scoop and Update Inspired

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Family First by Kirsten Dunst

Photo by raphaelrsilva at Flickr.com

Kirsten Dunst says her family are the most important thing in her life.

The Melancholia actress says that as she’s got older she’s realised what matters to her and now loves spending time with her parents and grandparents.

Kirsten, 29, lives with her younger brother Christian and admits she’s ‘lucky’ with the friends and family she has.

Read more at Virgin Media

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