Which Parenting Style Works Best

Singaporean  Daniel Wong writes through the work he has done with thousands of students and parents, he has come across a lot of angry, bitter children and their loving but confused parents. “As a parent, sometimes love isn’t enough.”

“Just to be clear, this article is about parenting from a child’s perspective, which is my area of expertise given that I’ve worked with many youths,” he adds. Parenting can mostly be summed up by two traits: unconditional acceptance of their children and expectations of excellence of their children.

Read more about these traits and the various categories a parent goes through in parent at Yahoo! Singapore.

Photo from source.

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Parents Ask Should They Buy Their Kids Violent Video Games

Kids playing video games

Amy Dickinson is a columnist for The Washington Post and was recently asked by parents of two sons, ages 9 and 12, if they should hold their ground in buying their children video games that are rated T and M, all combat-type, shoot-em-up, kill-em-all, violent versions. It may matter in the house but once the boys visit their friends where parents allows these types of violent video games, they have no control over that.

Should these parents just give in?

Read the entire Q&A at The Washington Post

Photo by halfcaucazn at Flickr.com

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Children Who Walk to School Everyday Are Much Healthier

A long time ago, our parents used to study in a school that’s nearest to their house. Today, city life forces us to ride cars, school buses and public transportation to reach the school our kids go to. Not that it’s too far but crime has gone up considerably since and the penchant of parents to think of their children’s safety is paramount to providing them food, shelter and education.

CBC News recently wrote that researchers in Canada decided to analyze the characteristics of youngsters making their way to school under their own steam, described as “active transportation” — as opposed to getting a ride or taking a bus — to see what patterns emerged. Their study showed that children from lower socio-economic backgrounds, those with a single parent and those with an older sibling were more likely to fall into this category, they discovered. It also says that active transportation peaks at ages 10 to 11, and then declines after that. However, only 35 percent of that age category use active transportation.

Though schools have physical education classes every week, it isn’t much to garner for the amount of bodily activity they need. The thought that comes into mind is for parents to find creative means of allowing their kids to do active transportation on a routine basis. One could be dropping them off at their classmate’s house which is a few hundred meters away from school; pick them up at the restaurant or mall nearest to their school.

If you don’t live in a gated subdivision, find a way to create a routine where the daily activity of walking becomes a norm. The study also revealed that children who used active transportation over the course of three years had fewer weight issues, and consistently had a lower body mass index growth curve. One idea is to park your car near your kids school and walk with them. This way, you, too, get the much needed exercise.

Source: CBC News

Photo by zinkwazi at Flickr.com

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Selma Blair and Her Happy Family

Photo from celebritybabyscoop.com thru INFPhoto.com

Proud new parents Selma Blair and Jason Bleick strolled hand-in-hand as they took their new baby boy Arthur for a walk around their Hollywood, California neighborhood today (August 6). This is the first we’ve seen of the couple since they welcomed their son on July 25.

Selma Blair first gained popular attention for her performance in Cruel Intentions (1999), a youthful retelling of the classic novel “Les Liaisons Dangereuses”. After graduating from high school in Michigan, Selma moved to New York City to pursue her goal of being a photographer but found her way to acting classes at The Stella Adler Conservatory and The Column Theatre.

Born Selma Blair Beitner on June 23, 1972 in Southfield, MI, the actress was the youngest of four girls. Her parents, Elliot and Molly Ann Beitner, divorced when she was 23; after which, she legally dropped her father’s name. “I have nothing to do with my father,” she said. “He is out of my life.” Her mother introduced her daughters as “the brain, the athlete, the klutz and then there was Selma – the manic-depressive.” Blair said she really was not that troubled, although her mom gave her a necklace with a smile on one side and a frown on the other to reflect her quick-changing moods. She attended a Jewish day school and then Cranbrook Kingswood school in Bloomfield Hills, MI before attending Kalamazoo College her freshman year, where she acted in a play titled “The Little Theater of the Green Goose.”

Sources: Celebrity Baby Scoop and Update Inspired

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Family First by Kirsten Dunst

Photo by raphaelrsilva at Flickr.com

Kirsten Dunst says her family are the most important thing in her life.

The Melancholia actress says that as she’s got older she’s realised what matters to her and now loves spending time with her parents and grandparents.

Kirsten, 29, lives with her younger brother Christian and admits she’s ‘lucky’ with the friends and family she has.

Read more at Virgin Media

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Brad Pitt on Parenting

Photo by Candy_Kirby at Flickr.com

Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie are parents of three biological and three adopted children. “I know it seems extreme from the outside, but I’ve always kind of operated this way. When I know, I know, and why mess around?” Pitt, 47, said in an interview.

“I had a friend who had a big family when I was a kid. I just loved the chaos around the breakfast table and the fighting and the ribbing, and the mom making pancakes for everyone or the dad making pancakes.

Read more at News.com.au from The Daily Telegraph

Advertising is Now Entering Schools

Photo by usnavynvns at Flickr.com

I wouldn’t be surprised to see our not-so-cash-strapped schools in the Philippines putting advertising on letters to parents, school buses, heck! Maybe even the school uniforms. There’s nothing wrong or unlawful about it but if the need is there, I guess there’s nothing wrong about doing it.

Cash-strapped school puts advertising on letters sent home to parents

NBC — The cash-strapped school district in Peabody, Massachusetts is giving their money troubles the slip.

The school committee agreed to sell advertising that will appear on notices sent home to parents.

“It’s a unique way to try to not pass on additional fees,” said C. Milton Burnett of Peabody Public Schools.

“I think it’s a great way to bring money into the school system and also support our Peabody businesses,” said Tara Holleran, a parent.

Read more at KDSK in St. Louis, Mo